Select Topic:

 
 

A-Z Toxic Dictionary:


 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

“This is not a Material Safety Data Sheet but rather a Reference Data Sheet that has been compiled from a number of sources, and is intended to be a concise, relatively non-technical source of information on a particular material or category of materials. It is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct as of the date compiled; however, Unsafe Home makes no representation as to the comprehensiveness or accuracy of the information. It is expected that individuals receiving the information will exercise their independent judgment in determining its appropriateness for a particular purpose. Accordingly, Unsafe Home will not be responsible for damages of any kind resulting from the use of or reliance upon such information.”

Air Fresheners:

Can include phenol and formaldehyde. Did you know that most air fresheners do not freshen the air, but rather cover up the offensive odor with a more pleasant one? Or, actually interfere with your ability to smell by releasing a nerve-deadening agent or coating your nasal passages with an undetectable oil film?

Aftershaves:

Often contain formaldehyde, phenol and cresol.

Alkalies:

Are commonly found in bleach, ammonia automatic dishwashing detergent, low phosphate detergents, drain cleaners, oven cleaners, lime, color wave hair preparations, depilatories, alkaline disk batteries, Clinitest tablets for home glucose testing, and wet cement. Alkalies, also called bases, all have a pH range of 7.1 to 14.0. The corrosive effects of alkaline chemicals usually occur rapidly, sometimes with exposures as short as one second. Severe skin irritation and burns can occur from skin contact. Inhalation of fumes from alkalies may cause watering of the eyes, sneezing, coughing, choking, shortness of breath, and inflammation and irritation from the nose to lungs.

Aluminum Dust:

Is strongly fibrogenic [fibrogenic (fi•bro•gen•ic) (fi?bro-jen?ik) conducive to the development of fibers.]. Metallic aluminum dust may cause nodular lung fibrosis, interstitial lung fibrosis, and emphysema as indicated in animal experimentation, and effects appear to be correlated to particle size of the dust30; however, when exposure to aluminum dusts have been studied in man, most exposures have been found to be to other chemicals as well as aluminum. http://www.meridianeng.com/aluminum.html

Ammonia:

Is a poison. It can cause rashes, redness and chemical burns. Being very volatile, its fumes are extremely irritating to lungs and can be especially harmful to anyone with respiratory problems, especially children. It can also cause severe eye damage.

http://www.chem.tamu.edu/class/majors/msdsfiles/msdsammonia.htm

Potential Health Effects - Ammonia is very alkaline and reacts corrosively with all body tissues.
Inhalation: Corrosive. Extremely destructive to tissues of the mucous membranes and upper respiratory tract. Symptoms may include burning sensation, coughing, wheezing, laryngitis, shortness of breath, headache, nausea and vomiting. Inhalation may be fatal as a result of spasm inflammation and edema of the larynx and bronchi, chemical pneumonitis and pulmonary edema.
Ingestion: Corrosive. Swallowing can cause severe burns of the mouth, throat, and stomach, leading to death. Can cause sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea.
Skin Contact: Dermal contact with alkaline corrosives may produce pain, redness, severe irritation or full thickness burns. May be absorbed through the skin with possible systemic effects.
Eye Contact: Corrosive. Can cause blurred vision, redness, pain, severe tissue burns and eye damage. Eye exposure may result in temporary or permanent blindness.
Chronic Exposure: Prolonged or repeated skin exposure may cause dermatitis. Prolonged or repeated exposure may cause eye, liver, kidney, or lung damage.
Incompatibilities: Ammonia (anhydrous) is incompatible with mercury, chlorine, calcium hypochlorite, hydrofluoric acid (anhydrous), bromine pentaflouride, chlorine trifluoride, chloroformates, strong acids, strong oxidizing agents, brass, zinc, aluminum, copper, bronze, most common metals and dimethyl sulfate. Corrosive to copper, zinc and many metal surfaces. Reacts with hypochlorite or other halogen sources to form explosive compounds that are sensitive to pressure or increases in temperature. Reaction with sulfuric acid or other strong mineral acids is exothermic; mixture becomes boiling hot.
Conditions to Avoid: Heat, direct sunlight, incompatibles.

Asthma - Allergies:

Main Entry: asth·ma
Pronunciation: 'az-m&, British 'as-
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English asma, from Medieval Latin, modification of Greek asthma
: a condition often of allergic origin that is marked by continuous or paroxysmal labored breathing accompanied by wheezing, by a sense of constriction in the chest, and often by attacks of coughing or gasping

Making Informed Decisions: why it is important to know what's in the products you use

By Andrea DesJardins
© 2001, all rights reserved

Of the thousands of chemicals used in the manufacture of consumer products, a relative few are actually found as ingredients in the final formulation. While most chemicals are of little concern, a handful of toxic chemicals may be responsible for causing a number of avoidable human health effects.

There is value in knowing about the hazards of these chemicals, even if you never experience an adverse reaction, or the concentration of the chemical in the product is too low to be of major concern. Regardless of how dilute or infrequently used a product is, consumers have the right to know what is in the products they use. Without this information the consumer is unable to make an informed decision about continuing the use of those products with toxic ingredients.

It is the toxic ingredients in some consumer products that may be at the root of a host of common yet vague symptoms such as fatigue, headache, sinus irritation, sore throat and more. Because so many products may cause these symptoms, some people may experience persistent symptoms that can be significantly relieved or eliminated by the simple act of eliminating the use of these products.

One of the great myths about consumer products is that there are laws and regulations that prevent hazardous products from reaching the market; that products available to the public are tested and deemed safe for consumer use. This is only partially true.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is a 5 member panel responsible for overseeing over 15,000 types of consumer products, not including food, drugs, cosmetics, pesticides, automobiles, medical devices, certain radioactive materials and products that emit radiation (e.g. microwave ovens). Because of this huge number of products, the CPSC must rely on manufacturers to voluntarily comply with federal consumer product safety laws. These laws include the Consumer Product Safety Act, the Federal Hazardous Substances Act, and the Poison Prevention Packaging Act.

The primary role of the CPSC is to protect consumers from products that are known to cause injury when used in the way they are intended by the population for whom the product is aimed. There must be a clear cause and effect relationship. By law the CPSC may not publicly raise concern about the safety of a product without substantive evidence that a product poses a significant danger to the public. For this the CPSC relies on adverse reaction or injury reports filed by the public.

The CPSC does not test products as a matter of course; manufacturers are expected to make sure their products either are not hazardous, or if hazardous they are labeled properly. Manufacturers are not required to have their products reviewed prior to offering it for sale to the public. The CPSC may investigate reports of injury caused by consumer products and take appropriate action as warranted, but rarely do they initiate their own investigations.

For many products -- particularly those used around the home as cleaners -- manufacturers are allowed to protect their formulations as proprietary and thus are not required to list ingredients on their labels; however, if there are hazards associated with the product then basic safe handling information must be provided.

Products are considered hazardous if they meet the criteria outlined in the Federal Hazardous Substances Act:
(f) The term ''hazardous substance'' means:
(1)
(A) Any substance or mixture of substances which (i) is toxic, (ii) is corrosive, (iii) is an irritant, (iv) is a strong sensitizer, (v) is flammable or combustible, or (vi) generates pressure through decomposition, heat, or other means, if such substances or mixture of substances may cause substantial personal injury or substantial illness during or as a proximate result of any customary or reasonably foreseeable handling or use, including reasonably foreseeable ingestion by children [emphasis added. It is important to note that there is no definition for the term 'substantial.'].

(g) The term ''toxic'' shall apply to any substance (other than a radioactive substance) which has the capacity to produce personal injury or illness to man through ingestion, inhalation, or absorption through any body surface.

The absence of health and safety data does not exonerate a chemical. Of the some 80-100,000 chemicals used in manufacture, only a fraction have been tested for safety, and an even smaller number have been studied extensively. Additionally, because there are so many possible combinations of chemicals, very little is known about the effects of chemical mixtures, although there is some research which shows that the effects of mixtures can not always be predicted by evaluating the effects of the individual ingredients (that is to say, some mixtures may be far more toxic than the individual ingredients themselves because one ingredient may change the properties of another ingredient, making it more easily absorbed by the body. For example, a chemical that may have a lower toxicity via the inhalation route because it does not readily evaporate, may become more toxic by inhalation when combined with another chemical, such as alcohol, that makes it evaporate more easily).

This lack of knowledge makes it difficult to assess the true health risk associated with common consumer products. It is generally assumed that exposures to the hazardous substances will be low under 'customary handling or use' because most people are only using these products for a short period of time. This assumption does not take into account that many products evaporate into the air, are absorbed into porous surfaces and textiles, or used in combination with other products. Also, it may not take into account that particles of the product are aerosolized during use, making them more readily evaporated into the air. Further, it does not take into account that most modern homes do not have adequate fresh air inflow, and as a result the indoor air may be as much as 10 times more polluted than outdoor air. What this means is that cessation of use of a product does not necessarily equal cessation of exposure to the ingredients when a product is used indoors without full ventilation.

Since it is so difficult to assess the true health risk associated with consumer products, the next best option is to review the health effects of the ingredients and make the assumption that the product is at least as toxic as its most toxic ingredient. In the scientific world this would be an unreasonable assumption, but in the real world the lack of data leaves the consumer with little choice.

When evaluating the toxicity of a chemical, it must be understood that exposure to a chemical does not automatically mean that a person will experience the listed symptoms of exposure. In fact, most healthy adults will notice little, if any effect because the body has developed a rather efficient system for eliminating foreign chemicals before they have a chance to cause symptoms.

But not everybody is equal in their ability to fend off the effects of chemicals, and some chemicals (alcohols, for example) affect nearly everybody regardless of health. In those cases the degree to which symptoms are experienced is the variable.

The more susceptible populations include:
· People with allergies
· Children
· Pregnant women
· People with chronic disease in any organ (lungs, liver, kidneys, etc.)
· Cancer patients
· People with migraines or ASTHMA
People with allergies, regardless of the allergen, are more sensitive to irritants because allergy reactions produce a protein called 'nerve growth factor' which in turn makes nerve cells more sensitive to irritation from chemicals and particulates. [Read more about it]. Virtually every toxic chemical used in consumer products is an irritant in one way or another.

Children are more susceptible to the toxic effects of chemicals for several reasons. First, their bodies are not as well developed as adults, and their organs responsible for detoxification are not as efficient. Second, their smaller size means that it will take less of an exposure for their system to be overwhelmed. Finally, their proximity to the floor and frequent hand-to-mouth activity increases the likelihood that they will be more heavily exposed to chemicals that have settled into carpets, on furnishings and on toys.

Pregnant women are not necessarily more susceptible because of their pregnancy, but their child may be exposed to chemicals that cross the placental barrier, and that exposure may increase the potential for fetal harm. Most organic solvents are capable of crossing the placental barrier, but one of the greatest concerns for pregnant women are products containing alcohol. Even if the mother is simply inhaling alcohol fumes, her child may still be affected as if she had consumed an alcoholic drink.

People who have chronic disease in any of the major detoxification organs (i.e. liver, kidneys) are more susceptible to the effects of toxic chemicals because their detox pathways are not working as efficiently as people with healthy organs. As a result, chemicals in the bloodstream of these individuals will remain in their blood for a longer period of time and will thus have a greater likelihood of producing an adverse effect. The hidden issue here is that the body's most important detoxification organ, the liver, can lose as much as 70% of normal function before symptoms of liver disease surface. This means that there may be many individuals who are unaware that they may have malfunctioning detoxification systems.

Cancer patients are more susceptible to the effects of chemicals because their bodies are simply overwhelmed by the disease process and the treatments used to slow the progression of their disease.

People with migraines, ASTHMA or other chronic neurological or respiratory problems are generally more susceptible to certain effects of some chemicals, though there can be a variation of susceptibilities among individuals. For some the irritating component may be a factor, while for others the central nervous system effects may cause a reaction.

There is a great deal of variation of adverse effects caused by toxic chemicals, but fortunately most of the effects are generally reversible when exposures are kept to a minimum. Totally healthy individuals are not likely to have permanent health consequences as a result of judicious and careful use of consumer products around the home, but for people who are particularly susceptible to adverse effects--and that may be a larger proportion of the population than one would think--even conservative use of toxic products may have long term consequences.

The good news is that there are simple ways to reduce exposure to toxic chemicals around the home. Many products have low or non-toxic alternatives, both on the market or made in the kitchen. And for those products that simply can't be replaced in any practical fashion, good ventilation and cautious use can go a long way towards reducing risk.

Knowing what is in the products you use not only makes you a better consumer, it also makes you better able to identify and eliminate products that might be contributing to your unexplained symptoms. In this case, knowledge is definitely a powerful ally.

http://www.lungusa.org/site/pp.asp?c=dvLUK9O0E&b=22591

http://www.lungusa.org/asthma/astastrig.html

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Benzene (Pronounced ben'zeen)

Is a colorless liquid with a sweet odor. It evaporates into the air very quickly and dissolves slightly in water. It is highly flammable and is formed from both natural processes and human activities.

Benzene is widely used in the United States; it ranks in the top 20 chemicals for production volume. Some industries use benzene to make other chemicals which are used to make plastics, resins, and nylon and synthetic fibers. Benzene is also used to make some types of rubbers, lubricants, dyes, detergents, drugs, and pesticides. Natural sources of benzene include volcanoes and forest fires. Benzene is also a natural part of crude oil, gasoline, and cigarette smoke.

Benzene is an aromatic hydrocarbon that is produced by the burning of natural products. It is a component of products derived from coal and petroleum and is found in gasoline and other fuels. Benzene is used in the manufacture of plastics, detergents, pesticides, and other chemicals. Research has shown benzene to be a carcinogen (cancer causing). With exposures from less than 5 years to more than 30 years, individuals have developed, and died from, leukemia. Long-term exposure may affect bone marrow and blood production. Short-term exposure to high levels of benzene can cause drowsiness, dizziness, unconsciousness, and death. The current permissible exposure level is 1 part per million (ppm) in air for an 8 hour average with a short-term exposure limit of 5 ppm. Benzene can also be absorbed through the skin. http://www.toxictorts.com/benzene.htm

Bleach - (Chlorine):

Sodium Hypochlorite Liquid household bleaches are approximately 5% sodium hypochlorite solutions. Household bleach is an irritant and may cause skin, eye, and respiratory tract irritation. Dermatitis may result from direct skin contact. Ingestion of a few ounces or more of bleach may result in medical complications. DO NOT mix bleach with acids! Mixing household bleach with acids such as vinegar, ammonia, toilet bowl cleaners; and drain cleaners produces chloramine gas which can result in burning of mucous membranes and chemical pneumonia. If you use "fresh scented" bleach be aware that it may mask your natural ability to nasally detect overexposure to the bleach product. According to Susan Boothby, an attorney from Denver..."We have a special concern with the use of chlorine (found in laundry bleaches and other cleaners). Whenever chlorine is used, organochlorides are formed. Organocholrides are precursors to dioxins, a deadly class of compounds that cause toxic health effects at levels thousands of times lower than most other chemicals. Dioxins do not break down in the environment and they accumulate in human tissue. Anything bleached with chlorine has organochloride residues. A new EPA draft report on the dangers of dioxin warns for the first time that even trace amounts can cause serious health problems including birth defects, genetic mutations, threats to the immune and reproductive systems, damage to the liver, kidneys and skin and even cancer."

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Carpet and Upholstery Shampoo:

The active ingredient is usually perchloroethylene, which is a known human carcinogen. Immediate effects can be light-headedness, dizziness, sleepiness, nausea, and disorientation. Long term exposure may result in damage to the liver or central nervous system. May also contain naphthalene which according a chemical dictionary is "toxic by inhalation" and is suspected of causing cancer. Sometimes contains ammonia.

Chlorine:

Is toxic as a skin irritant and by inhalation. The greatest danger is when chlorine is mixed with other products, especially ammonia or vinegar. LOOK AT BLEACH

Chlorinated Solvents:

Most of these compounds can affect the central nervous system, liver, and kidneys. Most also will defat the skin causing dermatitis, and are irritating to the skin, eyes, and mucous membranes. Some can be absorbed through intact skin, and several are suspected or known to cause cancers. Several can cause rapid and erratic heartbeats. A summary of some of the properties is shown. http://www.meridianeng.com/chlorina.html

Chlorinated Scouring Powder:

Contains chlorine bleach. When mixed with water produces chlorine fumes. When mixed with ammonia produces chlorine fumes which can be deadly! For example, ammonia is not listed on many all-purpose cleaning products, so you may not be aware and use it in the toilet bowl and then sprinkle in some scouring powder with it----Watch out!!

Cresol:

A highly caustic, colorless solid or liquid with a sweet tarry odor, is used mainly as a disinfectant. Cresol is very corrosive to all tissues. When it comes in contact with the skin it may not produce any burning sensation immediately. Prickling and intense burning will occur followed by loss of feeling. If cresol contacts the eyes it may cause extensive damage. Cresol vapors and liquids are absorbed through inhalation and eye and skin contact. Repeated or prolonged exposure to low concentrations of cresol can produce chronic systemic poisoning. Symptoms of poisoning include vomiting, difficulty in swallowing, diarrhea, loss of appetite, headache, fainting, dizziness, mental disturbance and skin rash. Cresol attacks the central nervous system, respiratory system, liver, kidneys, skin and eyes.

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Deodorant Soaps:

Many contain ammonia, formaldehyde or phenol.

Deodorants And Antiperspirants:

May contain formaldehyde, ammonia and aluminum.

Detergent:

Household cleaning products which are based on non-soap, synthetic surfactants and which are primarily used for laundering and dishwashing. There are several types of detergents including automatic dishwashing, hand dishwashing, enzyme, and low-phosphate detergents. All detergents contain "cationic," "anionic," or "non- ionic" detergents. Cationic detergents are the most toxic when taken internally. Symptoms from ingestion include nausea, vomiting, shock, convulsions, and coma as quickly as one to four hours after ingestion, due to rapid absorption. By themselves, anionic detergents have low toxicity causing mild, local irritation of skin and eyes. But the addition of "builders" to anionic detergents is common and makes anionic detergents alkaline and caustic. Non ionic detergents have low toxicity. At most, mild irritation of the skin and mucous membranes occurs. Ingestion causes no hazardous effects. Some typical nonionic detergents are alkyl aryl polyether sulfates, alcohol sulfonates, alkyl phenol polyglycol ethers, and polyethylene glycol alkyl aryl ethers. Detergents are responsible for many household poisonings. Part of the problem is that detergent boxes are brightly colored and attractive and commonly stored in low, accessible places. There is a common misconception that low-phosphate detergents are "safe." While low phosphate detergents are safer to the environment, they are 100 to 1000 times more caustic than phosphate detergents. This means that low-phosphate detergents can cause serious burns if even a small amount is ingested. Since powdered granules are more difficult to accidentally swallow, powdered rather than liquid detergents may be a safer choice if you have small children in the home. All detergents should be carefully stored well away from the reach of children.

Dishwashing Detergents:

Most contain chlorine in a dry format that, when it comes in contact with water in the dishwasher, releases chlorine fumes into the air that leak out into the kitchen. Dishwasher liquids often contain ammonia.

Disinfectant Cleaners:

From the labels- WARNING! Contains flammable propellants. Can burn the skin and cause permanent corneal damage (eye damage.) Fumes can strongly irritate the nose, throat and lungs. From the Material Safety Data Sheets - Disinfectant cleaners contain – phenol, 2-butoxy ethanol, formaldehyde. Potential harms include cancer, CNS disorders (central nervous system), liver damage, reproductive disorder, kidney damage

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Ethanol

Some rubbing alcohols contain ethanol (Isopropyl alcohol), also known as isopropanol, is a colorless liquid with a pleasant odor. It is highly flammable. Isopropyl alcohol is found in alcohol sponges, cleaning agents, and rubbing alcohol, and is a good disinfectant. Most rubbing alcohol contains 70% isopropyl alcohol. Poisoning can occur through skin absorption, oral ingestion, or inhalation. Symptoms from ingestion, inhalation or absorption of large quantities include flushing, headache, dizziness, mental depression, nausea, vomiting, anesthesia, and coma. Alcohol baths or sponges to soothe a fever can lead to acute poisoning through skin absorption or inhalation. Instead, the Regional Poison Center suggests using tepid water as a sponge bath to fight fever.

Endocrine Disruptors:

Endocrine disruptors (hormone disruptors, xenoestrogens) are substances that are capable of interfering with hormones by mimicking them, blocking them or otherwise changing normal hormone behavior. Endocrine disruptors can cause harm to a number of systems in the body.

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Formaldehyde:

Reported short-term effects of inhalation of formaldehyde gas include bronchitis, pulmonary edema (fluid in the lungs), inflammation of the lungs and respiratory tract, pneumonia, and respiratory failure resulting in death. Lower concentrations (2 - 3 ppm) can cause tingling of the nose and back of the throat, but tolerance to higher concentrations can occur in some individuals. Most people can tolerate 4 - 5 ppm for up to 30 minutes, but after that time period discomfort increases. Breathing becomes difficult at 10 - 20 ppm. Serious injury is likely to occur with brief exposures to 50 - 100 ppm, which could cause edema (fluid build-up) in the lungs, inflammation of the lungs, and death. Pulmonary edema can develop several hours after exposure to these high concentrations. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has established a tentative IDLH (Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health) value of 30 ppm. This means that exposure to that concentration for thirty minutes or more could result in permanent injury or death.
http://www.meridianeng.com/formalde.html

Feminine Douches:

Generally contains ammonia and phenol.

Fluoride Toothpaste:

Many contain ammonia, formaldehyde and ethanol.

Furniture And Floor Polish:

Contains phenol and nitrobenzene which is very toxic.

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Germ Killing Disinfectants:

Many contain phenol, formaldehyde, ammonia, chlorine and also cresol which are easily absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes of the respiratory tract. It can also damage liver, kidneys, lungs, pancreas, and spleen and affect the central nervous system resulting in depression, hyperactivity and irritability. Many use disinfectants when someone is ill, just when the sick person is the most vulnerable to toxic effects.

Glass and Multi-Surface Cleaners:

Major ingredient is generally ammonia.

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Hair Sprays, Styling Mousses And Shampoos:

Commonly use formaldehyde hidden under the name "quatemium-15".

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Insecticide:

A substance that kills anthropods, such as hard shelled insects, spiders, millipedes and scorpions.

Integrated Pest Management:

A systemic approach to pest control which relies on prevention, identification and control by the least harmful means, such as biological controls, first before moving on to more toxic methods.

Irradiation:

For food items, exposure to ionizing radiation can kill harmful bacteria and disease-causing parasites. Surgical tools are irradiated to sterilize them. While not a common practice yet in the U.S., irradiation is currently approved for use on meat, poultry, wheat flour, white potatoes, herbs, spices, fruits and vegetables.

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

(J) No glossary terms for this letter now.

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

(K) No glossary terms for this letter now.

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Laundry Detergents

Can contain many caustic chemicals, residues left in clothing, sheets and towels can cause severe skin rashes.

Lead:

The link between adverse health effects and lead exposure may be difficult to discover initially when symptoms are common ailments such as upset stomach or fatigue. It is desirable to control environmental exposure to lead so that entry of this contaminant into the body is minimized and likewise the risk of lead-related diseases.
Uptake and Body Burden Lead can be initially absorbed by two primary routes: inhalation (breathing) and ingestion (eating). Through either route, lead enters the bloodstream and therefore can be distributed to various organs and body tissues. Most of the lead absorbed is deposited in bones (90%) and may be released over time. Lead that passes through tissues and organs can be excreted in urine, bile, kidney stones, hair and nails. Lead that is not excreted but stays in organs and tissue can cause disease over time. The most common procedure to measure a person's lead intake after exposure is through blood testing. However, blood lead alone does not provide information on total body burden which would include lead deposited in bones, organs and tissue. Blood lead level at any given time is an indication of lead exposure at some point in the past. Blood lead is a good indicator of recent lead absorption if anemia is not present and chelating agents for lead removal have not been taken.

A very small amount of lead absorption can elicit immediate adverse health effects both in adults and children; however, the same amount of lead absorption in infants and children can be especially harmful to them because of their rapidly developing nervous systems. http://www.meridianeng.com/lead.html

Lye:

A Caustic. (sodium hydroxide or potassium hypochlorite) cleans by a chemical reaction that burns or eats away other substances. Caustics also wear out your clothes faster and dull the fabric’s colors. Lye, also known as caustic soda, sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, and caustic potash, is commonly used in drain cleaner, oven cleaner, and in some nonphosphate detergents. Lye is extremely caustic. Its chemical action eats away materials (including skin tissue). Contact with skin or mucous membranes causes burns and frequently deep ulcerations with scarring. Mists, vapors, and dust can cause small burns. Eye contact causes severe damage, including blindness. Use: Caustic products containing lye should be properly labeled with the words "Danger" and "Poison" to indicate their dangerous nature. Lye-based liquids usually contain a warning to avoid squeezing the container, but carelessness could lead to a disfiguring splash on the skin or a blinding squirt in the eye. Products that contain lye in a pellet form sometimes require you to measure a spoonful out of an opening which is too small for a spoon to fit. This situation is very hazardous because lye-based pellets are easily spilled as one pours the product from the container onto the spoon. Be extremely careful when using lye-based products. Wear gloves and goggles in addition to protecting exposed skin. Avoid fumes by using only under conditions where adequate ventilation exists. Immediately wipe up spilled lye and wash off with plenty of water.

HEALTH HAZARD INFORMATION - Acute Health Effects:
The following acute (short term) health effects may occur immediately or shortly after exposure to Sodium Hydroxide:

  • Sodium Hydroxide causes very severe burns of the eyes which can cause permanent damage:
    * Contact can cause severe skin burns.
    * Breathing Sodium Hydroxide can irritate the mouth, nose, and throat. Exposure to higher levels may irritate the lungs, causing coughing and/or shortness of breath. Still higher exposure can cause a buildup of fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema). This can cause death.
    Chronic Health Effects
    The following chronic (long term) health effects can occur at some time after exposure to Sodium Hydroxide and can last for months or years:
    Cancer Hazard
    * According to the information presently available to the New Jersey Department of Health, Sodium Hydroxide has not been tested for its ability to cause cancer in animals.
    Reproductive Hazard
    * According to the information presently available to the New Jersey Department of Health, Sodium Hydroxide has not been tested for its ability to adversely affect reproduction.
    Other Long Term Effects
    * Very irritating substances may affect the lungs. It is not known whether Sodium Hydroxide causes lung damage.
 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Material Safrty Data Sheets:

The purpose of a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is to inform industrial purchasers and users of hazardous chemicals of the reasonably foreseeable physical and chemical hazards that may arise from the use of those chemicals. Most materials packaged for consumer use are exempt from the requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). The MSDS should include precautions for normal use, handling, storage, disposal, and spill cleanup. It should not include recommendations for protective measures that are more strict than needed. OSHA states, in the inspection procedures for the HCS. "Some MSDSs include recommendations for protective measures that are for 'worst case scenarios,' e.g., recommending supplied air suits for products of relatively low toxicity. The HCS requires that accurate information be provided on the MSDSs. This applies as much to 'overwarning' on the MSDS and label as well as the absence of information ('underwarning')."
http://www.meridianeng.com/msds.html The U.S. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) requires manufacturers and importers of hazardous chemicals to distribute Material Safety Data Sheets to purchasers or users of the chemicals upon request. MSDS contain information about hazards of the product, how to use the product safely, what to expect if the recommendations are not followed, what to do if accidents occur, how to recognize symptoms of overexposure, and what to do if such incidents occur.

Mold and Mildew Cleaners:

May contain phenol, formaldehyde, and kerosene.

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

NTA's:

An assortment of toxic chemicals with un-pronounceable names like Nitrilotriacetic Acid (NTA). The Merck Index refers to NTA as a “substance we may reasonably anticipate to be a carcinogen (cancer causing substance.) Amazingly it is still allowed in our laundry compounds.

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Offgas:

Many chemicals used in consumer products can be released as fumes, or gases. The process is called "offgassing." These gases can become trapped indoors and levels can increase in concentration over time if there is poor ventilation. These gases can also resolidify as particles that settle onto surfaces and floors, where they may be picked up on hands and then ingested accidentally. Some products, such as carpets and particleboard, may offgas for many months, while others, such as paints, offgas only when wet.

Oven Cleaners:

Major ingredients are lye and ammonia.

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

Phenol:

Is suspected to cause cancer and when it comes in contact with skin can cause it to swell, peel, and burn or break out in hives and may cause death with a prolonged exposure. Even a small amount taken internally can cause circulatory collapse, convulsions, cold sweats, coma and death!

Phenol, also known as carbolic acid, is flammable, corrosive, and very toxic. Phenolic compounds have a distinct odor and are used in disinfectants, deodorizers, paints, and as anesthetic for skin. Ingestion of even small amounts may cause vomiting, circulatory collapse, paralysis, convulsions, and coma. Light sensitivity and sinus congestion are common with exposure to fluids or vapors. Fatal poising can occur through skin absorption. Phenol and related compounds rapidly denature all proteins they come in contact with, including skin. Severe burns may occur upon contact. A concentration of 1% phenol, used to prevent itching from insect bites and sunburn, applied over several hours, was reported to cause gangrene in one individual. Skin ulcerations, skin rashes, swelling, pimples, and hives have been widely reported. The anesthetic properties of phenols can allow extensive damage to skin tissue before pain is perceived. Although there have been many poisonings from phenolic solutions, phenol continues to be used in consumer products.

http://w3dibit.hsr.it/nfc/w3dibit/safety/schede/Phenol_US.html

http://www.chemindustry.com/chemicals/index.asp?id=2399&name=Phenol

Synonyms: Anbesol, component of, Campho-Phenique Cold Sore Gel, component of, Campho-Phenique Gel, component of, Campho-Phenique Liquid, component of, Carbolic Acid, hydroxybenzene, oxybenzene, phenic acid, Phenol, phenyl hydroxide, phenylic acid,

Phosphates:

Phosphorus a fertilizer that causes algae to grow and depletes oxygen out of the water.)
Why do they use them in laundry detergents? Because they soften the water and enhance performance. Phosphates are one of the contributors the resulted to virtual death of Lake Erie in the 1970’s. It also contributed to the ruining of Cascade Reservoir in Idaho.

Perfumes:

Often contain formaldehyde, phenol and cresol.

Pet Care:

Flea collars, sprays, powders and shampoo can place your pet near very harmful pesticides and can also affect you and your children.

 
 

A

-

B

-

C

-

D

-

E

-

F

-

G

-

H

-

I

-

J

-

K

-

L

-

M

-

N

-

O

-

P

-

Q

-

R

-

S

-

T

-

U

-

V

-

W

-

X

-

Y

-

Z

 
 

HERE IS A LIST OF KNOWN TOXINS IN SOME OF OUR EVERYDAY PRODUCTS:

Dove Beauty Bar: Quaternium 15: Formaldehyde-Carcinogen. Causes cancer, dermatitis, neurotoxic, sensitizer-poisonious, irritant to the skin, eyes, and mucous membranes.
Butylated Hydroxytoluene, (BHT) Carcinogen.

Johnson's Baby Shampoo: Quaternium 15: FD&C RED 40: Carcinogen, and causes dermatitis.

Crest Tarter Control Toothpaste: Saccharin: Carcinogen, contains Phenol Fluoride: Carcinogen. If you accidentally swallow more than a pea-sized amount of this, you must contact the Poison Control Center immediately. This warning does not appear on the tube.


Tide & Cheer Detergent:
Detergent: Can cause temporary respiratory tract irritation. Symptoms include stinging, swelling, or redness.
Sodium Silicate: Can be corrosive. Can cause burns to the eyes and tissue damage to the skin, as well as cause burns to the mouth, throat, and stomach if swallowed.
Sodium Sulfate: Corrosive, Severe eye, skin, and respiratory irritant. Can cause asthma attacks.
Trisodium Nitrilotriacetate: Carcinogen

Clorox: Sodium Hypochlorite: Corrosive.
Sensitizer: Can be fatal if swallowed. Eye, skin, and respiratory irritant. Especially hazardous to people with heart conditions or asthma.

Cascade: Sodium Hypochlorite: Corrosive.
Sodium Silicate: Can be corrosive. Can cause burns to the eyes and tissue damage to the skin, as well as cause burns to the mouth, throat, and stomach if swallowed.
http://www.onetiredpup.com/toxins.html

   
   
   
 

:::GO BACK:::

   
   
 
 
 
 

Misleading Labels:

The New York Poison Control Center reports that 85% of product warning labels were either inadequate or incorrect for identifying a poison, and for first aid instructions.

 

Immune System targeted:

Formaldehyde, phenol, benzene, toluene, xylene are found in common household cleaners, cosmetics, beverages, fabrics and cigarette smoke. These chemicals are cancer causing and toxic to the immune system.

 

Bleach?

There has been a call from the U.S./ Canadian Commission to ban bleach in North America. Bleach is being linked to the rising rates of breast cancer in women, reproductive problems in men and learning and behavioral problems in children.